Royal or spoiled?

instagram:

Refueling with @patch_wick
 Want to see more photos? Be sure to follow @patch_wick’s account!
Aerial refueling is a mind-boggling task, but Instagrammer and U.S. Air Force Reservist @patch_wick’s photos share what it’s like first-hand. Patrick Stout captures his photos from the rear of KC-135 planes. There’s a window that looks straight down at the earth, and helps boom operators like Patrick see the aircraft that they’re refueling.
Boom operators are in control of the refueling pump or “boom.” They lie on their stomach throughout the entire process, moving the boom around, latching it onto the aircraft, and finally pumping the fuel. @Patch_wick explains: “It’s an amazing process because both aircraft have to fly very steady. As you can see in some of my pictures, both aircraft are very close to each other. The boom operator also has to pay attention because he’ll have to unhook the boom quickly if the other aircraft pulls down or his aircraft pulls up.”
In the process, @patch_wick also gets to photograph some gorgeous views: “After the first time I watched a refueling, I continued to lay and watch the passing landscape. I always feel like I’m watching a high-definition version of Google Earth… [With my photos], I try to find cool and unique patterns. And I snap hundreds of pictures. With the in-flight refueling, I try to take as many angles as I can.”

Sweet shots! Wow!  instagram:

Refueling with @patch_wick
 Want to see more photos? Be sure to follow @patch_wick’s account!
Aerial refueling is a mind-boggling task, but Instagrammer and U.S. Air Force Reservist @patch_wick’s photos share what it’s like first-hand. Patrick Stout captures his photos from the rear of KC-135 planes. There’s a window that looks straight down at the earth, and helps boom operators like Patrick see the aircraft that they’re refueling.
Boom operators are in control of the refueling pump or “boom.” They lie on their stomach throughout the entire process, moving the boom around, latching it onto the aircraft, and finally pumping the fuel. @Patch_wick explains: “It’s an amazing process because both aircraft have to fly very steady. As you can see in some of my pictures, both aircraft are very close to each other. The boom operator also has to pay attention because he’ll have to unhook the boom quickly if the other aircraft pulls down or his aircraft pulls up.”
In the process, @patch_wick also gets to photograph some gorgeous views: “After the first time I watched a refueling, I continued to lay and watch the passing landscape. I always feel like I’m watching a high-definition version of Google Earth… [With my photos], I try to find cool and unique patterns. And I snap hundreds of pictures. With the in-flight refueling, I try to take as many angles as I can.”

Sweet shots! Wow!  instagram:

Refueling with @patch_wick
 Want to see more photos? Be sure to follow @patch_wick’s account!
Aerial refueling is a mind-boggling task, but Instagrammer and U.S. Air Force Reservist @patch_wick’s photos share what it’s like first-hand. Patrick Stout captures his photos from the rear of KC-135 planes. There’s a window that looks straight down at the earth, and helps boom operators like Patrick see the aircraft that they’re refueling.
Boom operators are in control of the refueling pump or “boom.” They lie on their stomach throughout the entire process, moving the boom around, latching it onto the aircraft, and finally pumping the fuel. @Patch_wick explains: “It’s an amazing process because both aircraft have to fly very steady. As you can see in some of my pictures, both aircraft are very close to each other. The boom operator also has to pay attention because he’ll have to unhook the boom quickly if the other aircraft pulls down or his aircraft pulls up.”
In the process, @patch_wick also gets to photograph some gorgeous views: “After the first time I watched a refueling, I continued to lay and watch the passing landscape. I always feel like I’m watching a high-definition version of Google Earth… [With my photos], I try to find cool and unique patterns. And I snap hundreds of pictures. With the in-flight refueling, I try to take as many angles as I can.”

Sweet shots! Wow!  instagram:

Refueling with @patch_wick
 Want to see more photos? Be sure to follow @patch_wick’s account!
Aerial refueling is a mind-boggling task, but Instagrammer and U.S. Air Force Reservist @patch_wick’s photos share what it’s like first-hand. Patrick Stout captures his photos from the rear of KC-135 planes. There’s a window that looks straight down at the earth, and helps boom operators like Patrick see the aircraft that they’re refueling.
Boom operators are in control of the refueling pump or “boom.” They lie on their stomach throughout the entire process, moving the boom around, latching it onto the aircraft, and finally pumping the fuel. @Patch_wick explains: “It’s an amazing process because both aircraft have to fly very steady. As you can see in some of my pictures, both aircraft are very close to each other. The boom operator also has to pay attention because he’ll have to unhook the boom quickly if the other aircraft pulls down or his aircraft pulls up.”
In the process, @patch_wick also gets to photograph some gorgeous views: “After the first time I watched a refueling, I continued to lay and watch the passing landscape. I always feel like I’m watching a high-definition version of Google Earth… [With my photos], I try to find cool and unique patterns. And I snap hundreds of pictures. With the in-flight refueling, I try to take as many angles as I can.”

Sweet shots! Wow!  instagram:

Refueling with @patch_wick
 Want to see more photos? Be sure to follow @patch_wick’s account!
Aerial refueling is a mind-boggling task, but Instagrammer and U.S. Air Force Reservist @patch_wick’s photos share what it’s like first-hand. Patrick Stout captures his photos from the rear of KC-135 planes. There’s a window that looks straight down at the earth, and helps boom operators like Patrick see the aircraft that they’re refueling.
Boom operators are in control of the refueling pump or “boom.” They lie on their stomach throughout the entire process, moving the boom around, latching it onto the aircraft, and finally pumping the fuel. @Patch_wick explains: “It’s an amazing process because both aircraft have to fly very steady. As you can see in some of my pictures, both aircraft are very close to each other. The boom operator also has to pay attention because he’ll have to unhook the boom quickly if the other aircraft pulls down or his aircraft pulls up.”
In the process, @patch_wick also gets to photograph some gorgeous views: “After the first time I watched a refueling, I continued to lay and watch the passing landscape. I always feel like I’m watching a high-definition version of Google Earth… [With my photos], I try to find cool and unique patterns. And I snap hundreds of pictures. With the in-flight refueling, I try to take as many angles as I can.”

Sweet shots! Wow!  instagram:

Refueling with @patch_wick
 Want to see more photos? Be sure to follow @patch_wick’s account!
Aerial refueling is a mind-boggling task, but Instagrammer and U.S. Air Force Reservist @patch_wick’s photos share what it’s like first-hand. Patrick Stout captures his photos from the rear of KC-135 planes. There’s a window that looks straight down at the earth, and helps boom operators like Patrick see the aircraft that they’re refueling.
Boom operators are in control of the refueling pump or “boom.” They lie on their stomach throughout the entire process, moving the boom around, latching it onto the aircraft, and finally pumping the fuel. @Patch_wick explains: “It’s an amazing process because both aircraft have to fly very steady. As you can see in some of my pictures, both aircraft are very close to each other. The boom operator also has to pay attention because he’ll have to unhook the boom quickly if the other aircraft pulls down or his aircraft pulls up.”
In the process, @patch_wick also gets to photograph some gorgeous views: “After the first time I watched a refueling, I continued to lay and watch the passing landscape. I always feel like I’m watching a high-definition version of Google Earth… [With my photos], I try to find cool and unique patterns. And I snap hundreds of pictures. With the in-flight refueling, I try to take as many angles as I can.”

Sweet shots! Wow! 

instagram:

Refueling with @patch_wick

Want to see more photos? Be sure to follow @patch_wick’s account!

Aerial refueling is a mind-boggling task, but Instagrammer and U.S. Air Force Reservist @patch_wick’s photos share what it’s like first-hand. Patrick Stout captures his photos from the rear of KC-135 planes. There’s a window that looks straight down at the earth, and helps boom operators like Patrick see the aircraft that they’re refueling.

Boom operators are in control of the refueling pump or “boom.” They lie on their stomach throughout the entire process, moving the boom around, latching it onto the aircraft, and finally pumping the fuel. @Patch_wick explains: “It’s an amazing process because both aircraft have to fly very steady. As you can see in some of my pictures, both aircraft are very close to each other. The boom operator also has to pay attention because he’ll have to unhook the boom quickly if the other aircraft pulls down or his aircraft pulls up.”

In the process, @patch_wick also gets to photograph some gorgeous views: “After the first time I watched a refueling, I continued to lay and watch the passing landscape. I always feel like I’m watching a high-definition version of Google Earth… [With my photos], I try to find cool and unique patterns. And I snap hundreds of pictures. With the in-flight refueling, I try to take as many angles as I can.”

Sweet shots! Wow! 

instagram:

Refueling with @patch_wick
 Want to see more photos? Be sure to follow @patch_wick’s account!
Aerial refueling is a mind-boggling task, but Instagrammer and U.S. Air Force Reservist @patch_wick’s photos share what it’s like first-hand. Patrick Stout captures his photos from the rear of KC-135 planes. There’s a window that looks straight down at the earth, and helps boom operators like Patrick see the aircraft that they’re refueling.
Boom operators are in control of the refueling pump or “boom.” They lie on their stomach throughout the entire process, moving the boom around, latching it onto the aircraft, and finally pumping the fuel. @Patch_wick explains: “It’s an amazing process because both aircraft have to fly very steady. As you can see in some of my pictures, both aircraft are very close to each other. The boom operator also has to pay attention because he’ll have to unhook the boom quickly if the other aircraft pulls down or his aircraft pulls up.”
In the process, @patch_wick also gets to photograph some gorgeous views: “After the first time I watched a refueling, I continued to lay and watch the passing landscape. I always feel like I’m watching a high-definition version of Google Earth… [With my photos], I try to find cool and unique patterns. And I snap hundreds of pictures. With the in-flight refueling, I try to take as many angles as I can.”

Sweet shots! Wow!  instagram:

Refueling with @patch_wick
 Want to see more photos? Be sure to follow @patch_wick’s account!
Aerial refueling is a mind-boggling task, but Instagrammer and U.S. Air Force Reservist @patch_wick’s photos share what it’s like first-hand. Patrick Stout captures his photos from the rear of KC-135 planes. There’s a window that looks straight down at the earth, and helps boom operators like Patrick see the aircraft that they’re refueling.
Boom operators are in control of the refueling pump or “boom.” They lie on their stomach throughout the entire process, moving the boom around, latching it onto the aircraft, and finally pumping the fuel. @Patch_wick explains: “It’s an amazing process because both aircraft have to fly very steady. As you can see in some of my pictures, both aircraft are very close to each other. The boom operator also has to pay attention because he’ll have to unhook the boom quickly if the other aircraft pulls down or his aircraft pulls up.”
In the process, @patch_wick also gets to photograph some gorgeous views: “After the first time I watched a refueling, I continued to lay and watch the passing landscape. I always feel like I’m watching a high-definition version of Google Earth… [With my photos], I try to find cool and unique patterns. And I snap hundreds of pictures. With the in-flight refueling, I try to take as many angles as I can.”

Sweet shots! Wow!  instagram:

Refueling with @patch_wick
 Want to see more photos? Be sure to follow @patch_wick’s account!
Aerial refueling is a mind-boggling task, but Instagrammer and U.S. Air Force Reservist @patch_wick’s photos share what it’s like first-hand. Patrick Stout captures his photos from the rear of KC-135 planes. There’s a window that looks straight down at the earth, and helps boom operators like Patrick see the aircraft that they’re refueling.
Boom operators are in control of the refueling pump or “boom.” They lie on their stomach throughout the entire process, moving the boom around, latching it onto the aircraft, and finally pumping the fuel. @Patch_wick explains: “It’s an amazing process because both aircraft have to fly very steady. As you can see in some of my pictures, both aircraft are very close to each other. The boom operator also has to pay attention because he’ll have to unhook the boom quickly if the other aircraft pulls down or his aircraft pulls up.”
In the process, @patch_wick also gets to photograph some gorgeous views: “After the first time I watched a refueling, I continued to lay and watch the passing landscape. I always feel like I’m watching a high-definition version of Google Earth… [With my photos], I try to find cool and unique patterns. And I snap hundreds of pictures. With the in-flight refueling, I try to take as many angles as I can.”

Sweet shots! Wow!  instagram:

Refueling with @patch_wick
 Want to see more photos? Be sure to follow @patch_wick’s account!
Aerial refueling is a mind-boggling task, but Instagrammer and U.S. Air Force Reservist @patch_wick’s photos share what it’s like first-hand. Patrick Stout captures his photos from the rear of KC-135 planes. There’s a window that looks straight down at the earth, and helps boom operators like Patrick see the aircraft that they’re refueling.
Boom operators are in control of the refueling pump or “boom.” They lie on their stomach throughout the entire process, moving the boom around, latching it onto the aircraft, and finally pumping the fuel. @Patch_wick explains: “It’s an amazing process because both aircraft have to fly very steady. As you can see in some of my pictures, both aircraft are very close to each other. The boom operator also has to pay attention because he’ll have to unhook the boom quickly if the other aircraft pulls down or his aircraft pulls up.”
In the process, @patch_wick also gets to photograph some gorgeous views: “After the first time I watched a refueling, I continued to lay and watch the passing landscape. I always feel like I’m watching a high-definition version of Google Earth… [With my photos], I try to find cool and unique patterns. And I snap hundreds of pictures. With the in-flight refueling, I try to take as many angles as I can.”

Sweet shots! Wow!  instagram:

Refueling with @patch_wick
 Want to see more photos? Be sure to follow @patch_wick’s account!
Aerial refueling is a mind-boggling task, but Instagrammer and U.S. Air Force Reservist @patch_wick’s photos share what it’s like first-hand. Patrick Stout captures his photos from the rear of KC-135 planes. There’s a window that looks straight down at the earth, and helps boom operators like Patrick see the aircraft that they’re refueling.
Boom operators are in control of the refueling pump or “boom.” They lie on their stomach throughout the entire process, moving the boom around, latching it onto the aircraft, and finally pumping the fuel. @Patch_wick explains: “It’s an amazing process because both aircraft have to fly very steady. As you can see in some of my pictures, both aircraft are very close to each other. The boom operator also has to pay attention because he’ll have to unhook the boom quickly if the other aircraft pulls down or his aircraft pulls up.”
In the process, @patch_wick also gets to photograph some gorgeous views: “After the first time I watched a refueling, I continued to lay and watch the passing landscape. I always feel like I’m watching a high-definition version of Google Earth… [With my photos], I try to find cool and unique patterns. And I snap hundreds of pictures. With the in-flight refueling, I try to take as many angles as I can.”

Sweet shots! Wow!  instagram:

Refueling with @patch_wick
 Want to see more photos? Be sure to follow @patch_wick’s account!
Aerial refueling is a mind-boggling task, but Instagrammer and U.S. Air Force Reservist @patch_wick’s photos share what it’s like first-hand. Patrick Stout captures his photos from the rear of KC-135 planes. There’s a window that looks straight down at the earth, and helps boom operators like Patrick see the aircraft that they’re refueling.
Boom operators are in control of the refueling pump or “boom.” They lie on their stomach throughout the entire process, moving the boom around, latching it onto the aircraft, and finally pumping the fuel. @Patch_wick explains: “It’s an amazing process because both aircraft have to fly very steady. As you can see in some of my pictures, both aircraft are very close to each other. The boom operator also has to pay attention because he’ll have to unhook the boom quickly if the other aircraft pulls down or his aircraft pulls up.”
In the process, @patch_wick also gets to photograph some gorgeous views: “After the first time I watched a refueling, I continued to lay and watch the passing landscape. I always feel like I’m watching a high-definition version of Google Earth… [With my photos], I try to find cool and unique patterns. And I snap hundreds of pictures. With the in-flight refueling, I try to take as many angles as I can.”

Sweet shots! Wow! 

instagram:

Refueling with @patch_wick

Want to see more photos? Be sure to follow @patch_wick’s account!

Aerial refueling is a mind-boggling task, but Instagrammer and U.S. Air Force Reservist @patch_wick’s photos share what it’s like first-hand. Patrick Stout captures his photos from the rear of KC-135 planes. There’s a window that looks straight down at the earth, and helps boom operators like Patrick see the aircraft that they’re refueling.

Boom operators are in control of the refueling pump or “boom.” They lie on their stomach throughout the entire process, moving the boom around, latching it onto the aircraft, and finally pumping the fuel. @Patch_wick explains: “It’s an amazing process because both aircraft have to fly very steady. As you can see in some of my pictures, both aircraft are very close to each other. The boom operator also has to pay attention because he’ll have to unhook the boom quickly if the other aircraft pulls down or his aircraft pulls up.”

In the process, @patch_wick also gets to photograph some gorgeous views: “After the first time I watched a refueling, I continued to lay and watch the passing landscape. I always feel like I’m watching a high-definition version of Google Earth… [With my photos], I try to find cool and unique patterns. And I snap hundreds of pictures. With the in-flight refueling, I try to take as many angles as I can.”

Sweet shots! Wow! 

instagram:

Tsukiji Fish Market (築地市場)
Want to see more photos of the Tokyo Metropolitan Central Wholesale Market? Visit the #tsukiji & #築地市場 hashtags, as well as the 築地 場内市場 & Tsukiji Fish Market location pages.
Tsukiji Market (築地市場) in central Tokyo is one of the world’s largest fish markets, handling over 2,000 tons of marine products per day. It’s frequented by visitors from all around the world who want a glimpse at the limited-admission daily tuna auction, exotic fish for sale at the small stands within the wholesale area, and the tourist-friendly outer market.
The busy atmosphere of scooters, trucks, sellers and buyers hurrying around in addition to the fresh fish and other seafood make the Tsukiji Market a can’t-miss photographic opportunity for Instagrammers visiting Tokyo!

Love the hat! instagram:

Tsukiji Fish Market (築地市場)
Want to see more photos of the Tokyo Metropolitan Central Wholesale Market? Visit the #tsukiji & #築地市場 hashtags, as well as the 築地 場内市場 & Tsukiji Fish Market location pages.
Tsukiji Market (築地市場) in central Tokyo is one of the world’s largest fish markets, handling over 2,000 tons of marine products per day. It’s frequented by visitors from all around the world who want a glimpse at the limited-admission daily tuna auction, exotic fish for sale at the small stands within the wholesale area, and the tourist-friendly outer market.
The busy atmosphere of scooters, trucks, sellers and buyers hurrying around in addition to the fresh fish and other seafood make the Tsukiji Market a can’t-miss photographic opportunity for Instagrammers visiting Tokyo!

Love the hat! instagram:

Tsukiji Fish Market (築地市場)
Want to see more photos of the Tokyo Metropolitan Central Wholesale Market? Visit the #tsukiji & #築地市場 hashtags, as well as the 築地 場内市場 & Tsukiji Fish Market location pages.
Tsukiji Market (築地市場) in central Tokyo is one of the world’s largest fish markets, handling over 2,000 tons of marine products per day. It’s frequented by visitors from all around the world who want a glimpse at the limited-admission daily tuna auction, exotic fish for sale at the small stands within the wholesale area, and the tourist-friendly outer market.
The busy atmosphere of scooters, trucks, sellers and buyers hurrying around in addition to the fresh fish and other seafood make the Tsukiji Market a can’t-miss photographic opportunity for Instagrammers visiting Tokyo!

Love the hat! instagram:

Tsukiji Fish Market (築地市場)
Want to see more photos of the Tokyo Metropolitan Central Wholesale Market? Visit the #tsukiji & #築地市場 hashtags, as well as the 築地 場内市場 & Tsukiji Fish Market location pages.
Tsukiji Market (築地市場) in central Tokyo is one of the world’s largest fish markets, handling over 2,000 tons of marine products per day. It’s frequented by visitors from all around the world who want a glimpse at the limited-admission daily tuna auction, exotic fish for sale at the small stands within the wholesale area, and the tourist-friendly outer market.
The busy atmosphere of scooters, trucks, sellers and buyers hurrying around in addition to the fresh fish and other seafood make the Tsukiji Market a can’t-miss photographic opportunity for Instagrammers visiting Tokyo!

Love the hat! instagram:

Tsukiji Fish Market (築地市場)
Want to see more photos of the Tokyo Metropolitan Central Wholesale Market? Visit the #tsukiji & #築地市場 hashtags, as well as the 築地 場内市場 & Tsukiji Fish Market location pages.
Tsukiji Market (築地市場) in central Tokyo is one of the world’s largest fish markets, handling over 2,000 tons of marine products per day. It’s frequented by visitors from all around the world who want a glimpse at the limited-admission daily tuna auction, exotic fish for sale at the small stands within the wholesale area, and the tourist-friendly outer market.
The busy atmosphere of scooters, trucks, sellers and buyers hurrying around in addition to the fresh fish and other seafood make the Tsukiji Market a can’t-miss photographic opportunity for Instagrammers visiting Tokyo!

Love the hat! instagram:

Tsukiji Fish Market (築地市場)
Want to see more photos of the Tokyo Metropolitan Central Wholesale Market? Visit the #tsukiji & #築地市場 hashtags, as well as the 築地 場内市場 & Tsukiji Fish Market location pages.
Tsukiji Market (築地市場) in central Tokyo is one of the world’s largest fish markets, handling over 2,000 tons of marine products per day. It’s frequented by visitors from all around the world who want a glimpse at the limited-admission daily tuna auction, exotic fish for sale at the small stands within the wholesale area, and the tourist-friendly outer market.
The busy atmosphere of scooters, trucks, sellers and buyers hurrying around in addition to the fresh fish and other seafood make the Tsukiji Market a can’t-miss photographic opportunity for Instagrammers visiting Tokyo!

Love the hat!

instagram:

Tsukiji Fish Market (築地市場)

Want to see more photos of the Tokyo Metropolitan Central Wholesale Market? Visit the #tsukiji & #築地市場 hashtags, as well as the 築地 場内市場 & Tsukiji Fish Market location pages.

Tsukiji Market (築地市場) in central Tokyo is one of the world’s largest fish markets, handling over 2,000 tons of marine products per day. It’s frequented by visitors from all around the world who want a glimpse at the limited-admission daily tuna auction, exotic fish for sale at the small stands within the wholesale area, and the tourist-friendly outer market.

The busy atmosphere of scooters, trucks, sellers and buyers hurrying around in addition to the fresh fish and other seafood make the Tsukiji Market a can’t-miss photographic opportunity for Instagrammers visiting Tokyo!

Love the hat!

What emerged in my mocha this morning. Thanks to a stellar Barista at Fremont Coffee Company.

webcommdesigns:

for all those important life events ;-)

Hopefully it doesn’t come to this ;)

webcommdesigns:

for all those important life events ;-)

Hopefully it doesn’t come to this ;)

"

A viral video vaulted Ted Williams and his golden voice to fame, but the real hero of this story is the woman he left behind.

Patricia Kirtley raised four daughters alone after Williams split 23 years ago and dove down the rabbit hole of drugs.

Not only that, Kirtley took in the baby boy the radioman had with another woman and raised him as her own.

Oh, and by the way, she’s partially blind.

“We survived,” Kirtley said Thursday in Reynoldsburg, Ohio. “My children are survivors. They know if we get a little bit that God provides, we make it into a lot. I’m a soup maker. I make potato soup and throw in a lot of vegetables and a little meat. We always ate.”

Except that Williams, who seems to be a nice guy, just wasn’t strong, wasn’t around and wasn’t contributing financially.

Kirtley had to go on the dole. “I still remember my case number,” she says ruefully. She eventually went to school and got licensed as a blind vendor.

“My mother and sisters pitched in and drove me because I can’t see to drive,” said Kirtley, now 58, over a din of some of her 16 grandchildren playing.

As if that weren’t enough, Kirtley said two of her sisters and a cousin each took in a child Williams and his druggie girlfriend couldn’t, or wouldn’t, care for.

“I didn’t want to see those children in no foster home,” she said.

Exactly. It’s an all-too-familiar story to the strong members of poor communities - usually women. They are the ones who must provide the backbone, as well as the hugs, for children whose parents get hooked on drugs.

"
— Now that the nation has gone berzerk with joy over Ted Williams, the homeless man we’ve decided is worth saving because we think is voice is so cool, it’s time to hear about the person in this story who really deserves some credit… (via jeffreyoverstreet)

I am currently writing, as of recently, Seattle neighborhood reviews and Seattle coffee house reviews

They are both fairly new, with content constantly being revised, so don’t just visit once.